The Duomo, Santa Maria del Fiore Cathedral in Florence

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Inside Florence's Cathedral, the Duomo

Address
Piazza Duomo
Ticket
Free entrance
Entrance is through right door facing the facade
Disabled access through the Porta dei Canonici (south side)
Opening hours
Open from 10am - 5pm
Thursdays: 10am - 4/5pm (depends on season)
Saturdays: 10am - 4:45pm
Sundays and religious holidays: 1:30 - 4:45pm
Holy week - Holy Thursday: 12:30 - 4:30pm
Good Friday: 10:30am - 4:30pm
Holy Saturday: 11am - 4:45pm
Days of closure
Closed on January 1, Epiphany, Easter, Christmas Day

Florence's cathedral stands tall over the city with its magnificent Renaissance dome designed by Filippo Brunelleschi. The cathedral named in honor of Santa Maria del Fiore is a vast Gothic structure built on the site of the 7th century church of Santa Reparata, the remains of which can be seen in the crypt.

The cathedral was begun at the end of the 13th century by Arnolfo di Cambio, and the dome, which dominates the exterior, was added in the 15th century on a design of Filippo Brunelleschi. A statue to each of these important architects can be found outside to the right of the cathedral, both admiring their work for the rest of eternity. Can you imagine it took two centuries for the cathedral to be deemed finished?

Florence Duomo - the inside and its mosaic pavement

The church was consecrated as soon as the dome was in place although the façade (front of the church) was only half finished by then. It was just decoration, and thus remained unfinished up until the 19th century. At that point, it was actually redone by the likes of the time and finally finished!

Did you know?

Florence's cathedral is the 4th largest in the world, after St. Peter's in Rome, St. Paul's in London and the Duomo in Milan.

The exterior is covered in a decorative mix of pink, white and green marble. The interior, by contrast, is pretty stark and plain but quite enjoyable on warm summer days since the temperature inside tends to be cooler. The mosaic pavements are certainly its main attraction within.

Please note the clock above the entrance on the inside of the church. It was designed in 1443 by Paolo Uccello in accordance with the ora italica, where the 24th hour of the day ended at sunset... and it still works!

The biggest artwork within the cathedral is Giorgio Vasari's frescoes of the Last Judgment (1572-9): they were designed by Vasari but painted mostly by his less-talented student Frederico Zuccari by 1579.

Frescos inside Florence's dome

Visiting the cathedral

Entrance into Florence's cathedral remains free and for this reason you'll at times find a long line to get in. Don't worry, the line moves pretty quickly! But in an effort to reduce the line, the cathedral administration is trying to increase the number of visitors allowed at any one time into the church as long as noise level remains low. The solution has been to require any group of over 4 visitors to rent either the radio or audio guides (cost is 2-2,50 euro per person) so that the level of noise inside the church remains low and larger amounts of people can be allowed inside at any one time. Large groups of students will receive 50% discount on the cost of the audio guide. If you're with a tour group, you'll likely already have the earphones and don't have to worry about this recent change.

Climbing to the top of Brunelleschi's Cupola

Don't forget to climb up to the very top of the cupola: read more details here.

View our photo gallery of the Duomo and its Cathedral View our beautiful photos of the Dome and Florence's cathedral! »

Florence's Cathedral

About Lourdes Flores

An American living in Florence for over 11 years, Lourdes continues to explore and discover new places in Tuscany with the eyes of a tourist but with the experience of living in Italy. She shares her experiences on this website, blog and offers travel planning help on the Forum! If you have questions for Lourdes, post them on the Forum.

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